The Price of Silence

We are responsible

Words To Captivate ~ by John Fioravanti

“The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the silence over that by the good people.”

~ Martin Luther King, Jr.

In an earlier post, “Indifference Is the Enemy”I reflected upon the issues of love, hate, and indifference. The quote above, by Martin Luther King Jr., is focused on the same idea. These words are relevant at any time, in any age, but they have taken on a new urgency today.

The events last week in Charlottesville, Virginia, were shocking to many people, but not just to the targets of the alt-right groups who parade openly, without masks or hoods, in defiance of standards of behavior expected by mainstream society. Their violence and messages of hate were met by outrage and denunciations by many people in America and around the world, except for one.

Violence erupts at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia (CNN.com)Violence erupts at a white nationalist rally in…

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Common Sense 2017

Now is the time for us… to think of and discuss common sense proposals. Much of this is about finding a fair balance between options, removing them from the weeds of ideology.  So here’s my list:

Champion equal opportunities for working people, and promote safe working conditions, viewing this as essential to individual freedom and responsibility by assisting economic independence

Support public education, viewing this as essential to a non-elitist, informed participation in civic affairs

Promote universal health care, viewing this as basic to human dignity and essential to national security

Show our ideals by living them, respecting individual and minority rights

Practice and support freedom of worship, freedom of the press, and the right to peacefully assemble to petition the government

Practice and support free speech, within the reasonable constraints of concern for others’ safety, to insure the flow of ideas and critical thinking so necessary for a free society

Support government policies and programs that aid people most in need, viewing these as essential to alleviating marginalization, isolation, and suffering, and to promoting a cohesive society in which everyone can equally participate

Promote a fair tax system that relieves the burden on the working poor and middle class and asks more (but not to the point of being punitive) of those who have prospered because of our healthy economy and sound government

Support far-sighted, science-based regulation to protect and enrich the environment, and working to bring together all stakeholders in this process

Support sensible gun safety rules and education, and community policing, in order to advance the spirit and principles of a civil society

Support businesses, especially small businesses, in order to strengthen communities

Support entrepreneurship in order to keep America at the forefront of technology, manufacturing, and distribution/trade

Promote community-based organizations, public libraries, a mix of public/private transportation, and community spaces, such as parks, playgrounds, and meeting place

– Mary Clark

THE TOUGHEST JOB YOU’LL EVER LOVE

The English Professor at Large

This is Peace Corps week and time to remember and honor the two years and three months I served as a Volunteer in Slovakia. It was 1994, and I was sixty-seven years old, part of a group of much younger, wonderful women and men. For our first three months, we went to training school to prepare for what the Peace Corps calls “The toughest job you’ll ever love.”
To help the process, we were farmed out to Slovak families who had volunteered to house us. Now, this was a gutsy move on their part. They had been raised during the Nazi and Soviet regimes, and Americans were always the enemy, and, suddenly, there we were….right in their living rooms. My family consisted of three women in their 40s, none of whom spoke a word of English. They were kind to me, and one of them, Ema, became a good friend…

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Health Care 2017

health-reality-logo

It’s time we faced the issue of health care coverage without the slant of ideology or partisan politics. Obamacare was flawed, but it was further crippled by Congress changing and not implementing some of its provisions, including those which provided funding for the program. Insurance companies professed interest, but several of the largest refused to participate in the marketplace of many states, citing fears they would be putting their better-paying customers in the position of paying for those less well-off and this was too big a risk to take. The hoped-for competition didn’t take place and premiums rose.

We have to face facts. Many rural areas and some inner city areas lack the economic base to provide quality health care to all of their residents. Some people perceive the economic gap as unfair, and believe a different arrangement would solve the problem. When that arrangement has been to receive financial help from the more affluent, often urban areas, or centralized government, it has added to the resentment. Buying policies across state lines, as has been proposed, only puts the burden on those states with a more affluent population. Tax credits will most likely be inadequate, and health savings plans cannot provide enough of a safety net in the event of chronic illness. The free market won’t solve the issue, either, since there isn’t a large enough market in many rural areas, insurance companies have little incentive to provide coverage. None of these address the basic problem of inequality.

Rather than repairing Obamacare or putting together a cobbled-together health care program, which will probably greatly resemble Obamacare, or fall far short of solving the problem, we need to take a fresh look at the problem. In my view, the best way to provide health care to everyone is to have a form of health care program similar to Medicare, with various options, into which everyone pays and everyone receives quality coverage. This would overcome the issues of income redistribution and inequality, and the anger and division which they create. Whether this program is operated by the federal and state governments or by a consortium of private and public health care providers, or allow people to choose between these models, would make for an interesting debate.

Resistance & Respect

November 10, 2016

We’ve elected a man who has made racist and sexist statements, and has also shown fascistic attitudes toward people who disagree with him or hold different views of individual rights, common decency, and the world at large. You may think my words here are alarmist, but the actions of human beings in relation to one another over centuries past shows a range of what can happen, and that includes the best and the worst. We need to stay vigilant at this time in order to protect our freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, and freedom to assemble peacefully in order to petition the government.

Do not let yourself be silenced. At this time it would be a good idea to form networks of people with the same concerns, keeping it local, and of those online you feel confident you can trust, in the eventuality one, or more, of you is harassed by people in your town, or online, or by local, state or federal law enforcement. Don’t think for a moment that fascism can’t happen in America. Many people in Germany believed the same thing about their country. They went about their everyday lives, after Hitler came into power, as if nothing had changed. The reality came to some too late.

Oh, some of the readers of this post are thinking, she is a socialist, or insensitive to our needs and dismissive of our point of view. The opposite is true. There were legitimate grievances that led people to vote as they did. I’ve written about some of those issues in a previous post on my literary blog. I believe socialism is a form of government that stifles creativity and individual as well as minority rights and opportunities. It’s a paradigm that wouldn’t work well in a society as diverse as ours. But now we’ve gone too far to the right, and vigilance and resistance is required to ensure that equality and liberty are preserved.

I don’t know if I’m related genetically to Abraham Clark, but I am related philosophically. He believed in the middle class and equal opportunities. His concerns were that the wealthy and privileged would form a ruling class. This concern was shared by Americans in the last election, when they repudiated the Clintons – who rose from the working class and middle class but have been part of the ruling elite for the last 30 years. I’m afraid we’ve simply put a new face on this. And Donald Trump has shown us clearly that he is an authoritarian who can’t take criticism. He may well respond to dissent with a heavy hand.

Above all, we need to respect one another, and remember those values we hold as inalienable.

Introduction to Independence 2

The American Revolution continues today, peacefully, toward the goals and ideals that fueled the Declaration of Independence. This is an ongoing endeavor, in our day-to-day lives and over generations.

 Independence 2 supports the movement toward social, political and economic freedom and equality. Inspired by Abraham Clark, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, this site explores the American vision of a just and free society.

Mary Clark

Economic Vision of Abraham Clark

Emancipation from the “yoke of British oppression,” although a cause for rejoicing, therefore represented to Abraham Clark only a stage in the securing of independence. “Let us not stop here,” he wrote, “or . . . we may awake in fetters, more grievous than the yoke we have shaken off.” 1 The state was in danger of falling into the “power of the merciless.” He summoned the “inhabitants of New Jersey” to face up to their new “crisis.” “Beware,” he addressed them, “lest although we have knocked off the shackles of British tyranny we should suffer ourselves to be duped into as bad a situation by artful interested designing men.” 1

The concept of tyranny had wider dimensions for Clark than for most of his contemporaries. Political oppression . . . could be countered by a judicious balancing of governmental power. Clark espoused the notion of constitutional safeguards for republican government, but he held that tyranny could also rise from economic power. His zeal for rescuing the indebted farmers stemmed from this belief. Impoverishment, he feared, would destroy the independence of the citizenry.  .  . . 1

“His social-political point of view, through life, resembled that of a seventeenth century English ‘Leveller.’” 2 He worried that “individual citizens would lose political freedom to wealthier ones who controlled their economic destiny.” 1

He believed that people cannot be free unless they are economically independent, and he saw participation in government as essential to ensuring that freedom.

1. Abraham Clark and The Quest for Equality in the Revolutionary Era 1774-1794, , by Ruth Bogin, Fairleigh-Dickinson University, 1982

2. Dictionary of American Biography, Vol. 1-2, Brearly-Cushing, Charles Scribner’s Sons, NY, 1929