4 Books on Violence – Camus, Arendt, Fanon & Zizek

Matthew Blackman

4168NrZuyNL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_1.The Rebel – Albert Camus

Camus’s The Rebel (L’Homme Révolté) was famously panned by Sartre and his friends in the periodical Le Temps Moderne.  In the published exchanges that ensued Camus was, it is often said, defeated in the rhetorical joust.  Even Tony Judt, a great admirer of Camus, said: ‘In L’Homme Révolté (1951) Camus offered some important observations about the dangers of lyrical revolutionary illusions; but Raymond Aron said much the same thing to vastly more devastating effect in L’Opium des Intellectuels, while Camus’s naive, almost autodidactic philosophical speculations exposed him to a cruel and painful riposte from Sartre that severely damaged his credibility with the bien-pensant intellectual Left and permanently undermined his public self-confidence.’

Camus was, partly as a result of this and partly his stance on Algeria, to withdraw into a paralyzing silence.  But the book itself is not without its merits…

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Author: literaryeyes

Writer, Independent Thinker, Poet

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