The Egalitarian Tradition

America’s egalitarian tradition is, in fact, a way of life for many Americans. Good and decent people operate quietly, without interest in praise or reward, and their belief in fairness is a way of life handed down without fanfare. Many Americans champion individual liberty, and social responsibility. They are rich, poor, middle class, members of varied political persuasions, races and religions.

This quiet dignity infuses the history of our country, as much as the disastrous and destructive actions that receive so much attention.

Abraham Clark represented this in his passion for fairness and his sense that equality was an achievable goal.

Mary Clark

The Legacy of Abraham Clark

Read The Legacy of this unique thinker and personality among our early founders: Abraham Clark, of New Jersey.

Abraham Clark was one of five men from the state of New Jersey to vote for the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. He was born on February 15, 1726, the only child of a local magistrate, Thomas Clark and his wife Hannah, in what was then known as Elizabeth Town, New Jersey. He was a farmer and surveyor, and served in public office for nearly thirty years.

While still a young man, he was appointed clerk of the New Jersey General Assembly. In 1766, he was appointed Sheriff of Essex County. He served in the Provincial Congress and was chosen in June 1776 to represent New Jersey in the Continental Congress. He was 50 years old when he signed the Declaration of Independence, a dangerous and defiant act of treason.

Abraham Clark Biographies

Read biographies of Abraham Clark, signer of the Declaration of Independence, New Jersey, and member of the Annapolis Conference that led to the Constitutional Convention.